Labrador Information!

 

Building a Dog-Run for Your Lab:

     Is your landscape damage costing more than you paid for the dog? If so, you need a kennel or dog-run: somewhere to secure the dog when you’re not outside with her. You can call a Fence Contractor; you can order an expensive kennel from a tack or feed store; or you can drive down to your local MEGA home improvement store, and in the Fencing Department you will find something for the “Do-It-Yourselfer”. Hmmmm, but what size do I get? There is this 6′ x 6′ x 4′ tall thing, It has chain link roof, and they even have a sun-shade cover for it. Hey, its on sale for $99! Hmmmm…You kind get what you pay for in this decision. They also offer these chain link panels, 6′ x 6′ only $39 each, and a gated panel for $67. For $260 that’s a 6′ x 12′ run, 6′ high. Well, $260 is less than replacing the roses, but check the thickness of the chain link. If you can bend it with you fingers, the dog can too with one bite. Where are you going to put this new dog-run? What I’m asking is: what type of floor will it have? If it’s out on the lawn, the lawn wont last. And what will the sprinklers do to it? If you put it on the patio, there goes your patio! If you put it on the side of the house, will it be on dirt? Ok, now it’s on dirt, and the dirt is full of bacteria.
Ok, Here’s that solution

     The follow directions are for a 6′ by 12′ dog run, Check actual measurements of the panels you purchased. First, go down to the lumbar yard, and buy (3) pressure treated 2″ x 6″ x 12′. Cut one board in half. Use 2 1/2″ deck screws and build a 6′ x 12′ frame (it will be 6″ tall). Assemble the panels around the frame. Now dig 9 holes 14″ round, 12″ deep, evenly spaced inside the frame. Fill the holes and frame with WASHED pea-gravel. You will need 0.8 yards of pea-gravel. At the gardening supply store, buy a yard sprayer. Fill it with bleach, (or “ODO-Ban” from Sam’s Club), and set it on the highest setting. After picking up waste from the gravel, spray the bleach, the follow that with fresh water (Make sure the dog isn’t in the run when cleaning).
Inside, your dog will need fresh water and a dog house. If you get the dog house with a flat roof, not only can he sunbath on top of the dog house, but he can also jump out of the dog-run! However, I have yet to see a dog that can balance on top of an “Igloo” or “Dogloo.” He will need a pad, or bed for the Igloo. If you buy an expensive bed for the puppy, she will be sure to shed it. I suggest carpet remnants. Cut 3 or 4 to shape. When they get nasty, throw them out and cut up some more.
OK! now you have a first rate dog run! Is this just for when you’re gone? Or will this be a permanent habitat? If this is the new residence for your family dog, don’t get a Labrador! At least not from us. Labradors want to be with you. Do not get a “trophy pet” and lock him up, out of site and out of mind. If that’s the kind of pet you want, I suggest you get a fish!

FEEDING:

     Feed 4 times a day (beginning with an 8 to 10 week old pup) Once the puppy is 4 to 5 months old (or all adult teeth are in) feed 3 times a day. Start with a cup to one full cup of dry kibble if he eats it all- feed more. If he leaves some, good. Feed 2 times a day from 6 months on. Your dog should not be considered fat. This can affect his health and his hip joints. You should see a waist line on a grown dog, and see the outline of his ribs. But you should never be able to count the ribs. (This applies to a grown dog only) Be sure to fatten your puppy while he is growing. He will use the food for growth.

    

     We personally, free feed our puppies and some of our adults dry kibble. This means the dry kibble is left out all day for them. They seem to eat only when they are hungry. No one seems to be overweight, or too thin. This method is entirely up to you. All dogs have different needs so the above feeding is only a guideline. Your pup is used to getting raw carrots, apples, squash, broccoli spears ground up and placed on top of the kibble lightly soaked with warm water every morning. This encourages them to eat their first meal. You may use a spoon or two of yogurt or cottage cheese, or egg, scrambled or raw once or twice a day. If you do not wish to add the water or the egg, all he really needs is the NuVet vitamin and a vitamin C in addition to the dry kibble

     We are feeding Life’s Abundance and add NuVet supplements for the first meal, I don’t recommend a crate training puppy to free feed. It makes it too hard to know when they need to eliminate. Remember, it takes 10 minutes to hour after a meal to eliminate. Life’s Abundance is recommended for the life of your dog it has a high protein content so as your puppy gets older you can feed your puppy the same food, but use more of it. It goes by the dogs weight, so be sure to look at the feeding instructions on the side of the bag. (the bacteria content is different and they will get very ill) I feed my dogs in crates here. It also eliminates fighting in multiple dog houses as well as food stealing. This way I can monitor who is eating what. (If you plan on feeding kibble in the crate, fine. I do not recommend feeding or giving water inside the crate)

Quick Tips:

If your puppy has diarrhea: use some chicken breast boiled up and broken into small pieces- on top of some white rice- 3 scoops of pumpkin (Libby’s, in the can) on top- for 3 days- if it persists past 4 days- call me.

For Yellow spots on the lawn- try some tomato sauce or paste. Scoop this on top of his food everyday as well. (A heaping spoonful) The acid in the tomatoes will neutralize the acid in the urine.

SNACKS:

     I don’t do too many snacks- but I recommend carrots, apples, squash, and homemade treats. As a fast food alternative, get some packaged or boxed biscuits or bones – at trader Joes- or look for Mrs. Hubbard’s or Life’s Abundance Snacks. Or you can bake your own with brown flour…I may have a recipe if you are interested See the butcher, and have him cut you up some bones with his ban saw. They can be placed in your freezer until your pup needs another. For obedience training, and sit, shake tricks, I use boneless and skinless chicken breast boiled and cut up into small pieces and placed in a zip lock bag in the fridge, as a training treat. Hot dogs, bacon and really yummy pup-perionis are all good too. Don’t give the puppy left over’s just yet. Make this transition very similar to what the puppy has had while living with us. When he is 4 months old, you can give him some left- over’s in his bowl after you are finished eating.

SUPPLEMENTS:

     We believe in Nu-Vet Canine Plus (herbs, and vitamins and supplements) All natural made with human grade ingredients which help to boost the immune system. A must for a puppy or dog on any kind of diet. With Nu-Vet, all you need is one a day- and they love it. This will keep them from many illnesses get and to boost their immune system to prevent ailments of many kinds. They have always on been on this supplement. Even while in the womb. We would like to see your puppy remain on the same diet we have planned for him/her. Remember the key is to make this an easy transition from our house to yours. Please do not change the routine in any way. Every day the pups get one NuVet plus canine (vitamin chewable). Because we believe in the Nu Vet supplement, we have based our extended guarantee on it. I have made it possible for you to get it directly from the manufacturer. It will be sold to you at my cost. Use my wholesale code, as this cannot be found in stores. (They only to sell to breeders and to Veterinarians.) Their # is 800-474-7044 order code: 32892. I encourage anyone who loves their pet including cats, to get on this product. We have seen amazing changes in coat, clarity, eye, allergies, flees (I could go on and on) My dogs are able to enjoy this supplement along with their Nu Joint supplement that we give them everyday, and I plan on doing this for the rest of their lives.

Recommended Dog Food:

     We have previously been recommending Nutro Natural Lamb & Rice products, but for various reasons we are now using  “Life’s Abundance”  dog food products. Click here to learn more about Life’s Abundance and why we decided to switch to their products. 1 BIG Plus, is that UPS Delivers this food to your Door. And, If you sign up for the “Auto-Ship” delivery, you will NEVER run out. Because, it’s never a “Good Time” to run out and buy Dog Food.

Delivered to your Door, Via UPS; we love good service!

Life’s Abundance foods are made with the finest ingredients, including:

    • -A proprietary blend of vitamins and minerals
  • -High-quality protein from chicken meal for strong muscles
  • -An antioxidant system including vitamins A, C and E.
  • – A selection of nutritious vegetables and fruits.
  • -Omega-3 fatty acids for healthy skin and a shiny coat.
  • -Calcium and phosphorus for healthy teeth and strong bones
  • -Dietary fiber to help maintain a healthy digestive tract.

  • This formula contains:
  •      No artificial flavors, No artificial colors, No corn or corn gluten, No wheat or wheat gluten, A balanced blend of calcium and phosphorous to support growing and aging bones, Our kibble has tested extremely positively with both puppies and adult dogs, regardless of breed or size, Optimal protein levels for growing puppies and adults, and Unique blend of antioxidants that support dogs throughout their life cycle.

FEEDING SCHEDULE

Begin Each Day, with a NuVet vitamin Supplement

FEEDING INSTRUCTIONS FOR PUPPIES:

(as advised from Life’s Abundance)

     When ready to eat solid food, begin feeding moistened kibble and “free feed” until fully weaned, between 6-8 weeks old. After weaning, feed the “Suggested Daily Amount” of dry kibble according to weight and add at least 25% more. Individual Meal Feeding: From 8 weeks to 4 months, divide the daily amount and feed 3-4 meals in a 24 hour period. From 4-6 months, divide the daily amount and feed 2-3 meals in a 24 hour period. Free Feed: Measure the entire daily amount into a dish and allow your puppy to eat at will over the course of a 24 hour period. This method of feeding may lead to obesity. Food requirements may vary for individual puppies.

     FEEDING INSTRUCTIONS FOR ADULTS: (as advised from Life’s Abundance)
Start with the suggested amount of Life’s Abundance per day. Use the “Suggested Daily Amount” as a guideline. You can increase or decrease the amount you feed by more or less depending on your dog’s weight and body condition. Be sure to keep fresh drinking water available at all times.

Approx
Body Wt. Lbs.

Suggested Daily
Serving Amount
In Cups

Avg. # of Servings / Bag

 

8 lb
Bag

20 lb
Bag

40 lb
Bag

3 – 10

1/4 to 2/3 cup

44 – 117

110 – 292

219 – 584

10 – 20

2/3 to 1 cup

29 – 44

73 – 110

146 – 219

20 – 30

1 to 1 1/2 cups

19 – 29

49 – 73

97 – 146

30 – 40

1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups

17 – 19

42 – 49

83 – 97

40 – 60

1 3/4 to 2 1/2 cups

12 – 17

29 – 42

58 – 83

60 – 80

2 1/2 to 3 cups

10 – 12

24 – 29

49 – 58

80 – 100

3 to 3 1/2 cups

8 – 10

21 – 24

42 – 49

Over 100

3 1/2 cups +
1/3 cup for each 10 lbs
of weight over 100 lbs

< 8

< 21

< 42

LIST OF SUPERIOR INGREDIENTS BEYOND THE FIRST FIVE INGREDIENTS!
     While the first five ingredients play a significant role in the nutritional make-up of your dog’s food, every single ingredient is important. For nearly a decade, tens of thousands of dogs and cats have been eating and thriving on Life’s Abundance foods. We attribute this success to our painstaking attention to the detail. Each and every ingredient in Life’s Abundance food is carefully chosen to work with the other to supply your companion animal with a highly nutritious and perfectly balanced meal every day, every year over a lifetime.

     HIGH-QUALITY PROTEINS:  Proteins are the building blocks of all living organisms. Protein is essential for all bodily functions including those of the brain, heart, skin, skeleton and many others. Life’s Abundance dog food contains at least 26% of high-quality protein. Look for identifiable animal proteins such as “chicken meal” rather generic terms like “poultry meal,” which can consist of any fowl (turkey, chicken, geese, etc.).

Chicken Meal
     Some foods contain chicken meat or chicken parts, which naturally hold a fair amount of water. We prefer to use chicken meal because most of the water has been removed, which makes it a concentrated source of protein. This means that there is a greater “protein content” in one pound of chicken meal versus one pound of chicken meat. That’s why high-quality chicken meal is a key ingredient in Life’s Abundance foods.

Eggs
     Eggs are one of nature’s most nutrient-dense foods and play an important role in a balanced diet. They are considered a complete protein source, providing essential amino acids, vitamins and minerals (vitamins A, B, E, K, Biotin, and Sulfur). Eggs also provide healthy fats, such as omega-6 for healthy skin and a glossy coat.

Catfish Meal
     Our top-quality fish meal is made by drying the freshest catfish at a low temperature, creating a concentrated, highly-digestible protein source. In addition to being an excellent source of protein, catfish meal provides natural DHA and EPA, the most important of all the omega-3 fatty acids.

Chicken Fat

     We believe the primary fat source in dog food should be animal based   because these fats contain a profile of fatty acids that are easily metabolized and generally more available to the body. Animal fats can vary in quality, so look for a species-specific fat like “chicken fat” (versus “animal fat”) to be certain of the kind of fat your dog is eating.

Whole Grains

     Whole grains are an excellent source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc and other essential minerals. They also provide the kind of carbohydrates that deliver sustained energy to your dog. We include the natural goodness of Ground Brown Rice and Oat Groats in Life’s Abundance Dog Food.

Ground Brown Rice

     Ground Brown Rice is the entire grain with only the inedible outer husk removed. This whole grain contains manganese, selenium, magnesium, as well as tryptophan and vitamins B1, B3 and B6.

Oat Groats    

     Oat Groats are whole oats that have been cleaned, toasted, hulled and cleaned again. Amazingly, they retain nearly all of their original nutrients after this process. Oat groats contain seven B vitamins, vitamin E, and nine minerals, including iron and calcium.

VITAMINS AND MINERALS: 

      The proprietary blend of vitamins and minerals in Life’s Abundance foods was carefully selected to work in concert with all of the other ingredients to enhance the overall nutritional value of the food.

Vitamins:

     Ascorbic Acid, vitamin E Supplement, Inositol, Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Biotin, Vitamin A Acetate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Citric Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid.

     Minerals: Potassium Chloride, Salt, Calcium Carbonate Monosodium Phosphate, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Proteinate, Selenium Yeast, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Potassium Iodide.

     ANTIOXIDANT SYSTEM:  Among other nutrients, our antioxidant system includes vitamins A, C and E plus vegetables and fruits. The colorful skin and flesh of different vegetables and fruits contain phytonutrients, essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber. Each vegetable and fruit was carefully selected for its unique nutritional properties.

Fruits and Vegetables:

Beets
Beets contain folate, manganese, potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, magnesium, tryptophan, iron, copper and phosphorus. The phytonutrient called betacyanin is responsible for the purple-crimson color of the beet.

Broccoli
Broccoli contains vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, folate, dietary fiber, manganese, trytophan, potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin B2, phospshorus, magnesium, protein, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B5, iron, calcium, vitamin B1, vitamin B3, zinc and vitamin E. Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains the phytonutrients sulforaphane and indoles.

Carrots
Carrots contain beta-carotene (vitamin A), vitamins C, D, E, and K, Riboflavin, Niacin, Calcium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Sodium and Iron.

Celery
Celery contains fiber, potassium and vitamin C. It also contains some vitamin A, calcium, and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin.

Lettuce
Lettuce contains thiamin, vitamin B6, iron and potassium. It is a very good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate and manganese.

Parsley
Parsley contains vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, folate and iron. It also contains antioxidant phytonutrients called flavonoids including apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol and luteolin.

Watercress
Watercress contains folate, pantothenic acid and copper. It is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E (Apha Tocopherol), vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and manganese.

Blueberries
Blueberries contain vitamin C, manganese, vitamin E and dietary fiber. The antioxidant phytonutrients called Anthocyanins are responsible for the blue-red pigments found in blueberries.

Pomegranate
Pomegranate contains vitamin C and potassium. The polyphenols in pomegranate (hydrolyzable tannins called punicalagins) are responsible for the red color.

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS
Omega-3 fatty acids are some of the most extensively researched natural nutritional ingredients in the world. Among its many health benefits, the omega-3’s in Life’s Abundance help support healthy skin and a shiny coat. We also included flaxseed meal for its outstanding nutritional profile and its contribution to healthy skin and coat.

FLAX SEED MEAL
Flaxseed meal is the richest plant source of antioxidant lignans and Omega-3 fatty acids. Flax seed meal also has a very high level of highly-digestible protein and essential amino acids. In addition, flax seed meal contains significant amounts of fiber, vitamin E, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 and is extremely rich in the minerals potassium, calcium and phosphorus.

BREWER’S DRIED YEAST
Brewer’s dried yeast is loaded with highly-digestible protein with an exceptional amino acid balance. It also contains an abundance of natural minerals and vitamins, featuring B complex vitamins (except B12).

BEET PULP (SUGAR REMOVED)
Fiber is required in every diet to maintain healthy intestinal tract and proper nutrient absorption. We use beet pulp, which is the fiber from the gray sugar beet (sugar removed). Many studies have demonstrated that beet pulp performs better than many other types of fiber.

DIRECT-FED MICROBIALS
These ingredients are similar to those found in supermarket yogurts. Direct-fed microbials help support healthy immune and digestive systems. Life’s Abundance contains the following direct fed microbials: Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium thermophilum Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product.

News Flash:

Not all dogs can free-feed 🙁
Any Overweight Adult Labrador should get 1 cup A.M., and 1 cup P.M.

Raw Food Diets

If you have the time to Feed “RAW,” here’s a recipe I found. The most natural and healthiest of diets if you have the time and patience. Remember, the dog needs to fast 1 day/week

Breakfast:

– /4 cups raw ground beef or ground turkey or chunks of beef mixed with about 1/2 cup of raw mashed veggies

– 1 tsp kelp powder

– 1 tsp alfalfa leaf

– 1 raw egg (once or twice a week)

– 500 mg Vitamin C capsule

– 1 400 IU Vitamin E capsule

– 1 Vitamin B-50 tablet

– 1 tsp cod liver oil 3x a week or 1 capsule salmon oil

– 1 tsp apple cider vinegar

– Pinch of minced garlic

– 1 tsp ground flax seed

– 2 Glucosomine caplets (if needed for arthritis)

– 1 Shark Cartilage capsule (if needed for arthritis)

Dinner:

– 2-3 raw chicken backs each with all the fat and skin removed

– or 6-7 raw chicken necks

– or 1-2 raw turkey backs (these are harder and take longer to chew)

Snacks:

– raw marrow bones every once in a while to gnaw on

– raw chunks of apples

– raw carrots

– raw banana

-raw celery

-Ice cubes made from mashed fruit

Useful Websites for Lab Diet and Nutrition

– Dangerous Vegetables

–  FuzzyFace Dogfood guide

 Kibble Ingredients

 Polluted Pet Food

 www.dogfoodanalysis.com

 

POISONOUS FOODS:

Chocolate toxicity

     Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. When affected by an overdose of chocolate, a dog can become excited and hyperactive. Due to the diuretic effect, it may pass large volumes of urine and it will be unusually thirsty. Vomiting and diarrhea are also common. The effect of theobromine on the heart is the most dangerous effect. Theobromine will either increase the dogs heart rate or may cause the heart to beat irregularly. Death is quite possible, especially with exercise. After their pet has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours. Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell. Semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate are the next most dangerous forms, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate to be affected. Obviously, the smaller the dog, the less it needs to eat.

Onion and garlic poisoning

      Onions and garlic are other dangerous food ingredients that cause sickness in dogs, cats and also livestock. Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger. Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anemia, where the pets red blood cells burst while circulating in its body. At first, pets affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhea. They will show no interest in food and will be dull and weak. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected animals urine and it becomes breathless. The breathlessness occurs because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number. The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness. Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. A single meal of 600 to 800 grams of raw onion can be dangerous whereas a ten-kilogram dog, fed 150 grams of onion for several days, is also likely to develop anemia. The condition improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.

The danger of macadamia nuts

     Macadamia nuts are another concern. A recent paper written by Dr. Ross McKenzie, a Veterinary Pathologist with the Department of Primary Industries, points to the danger of raw and roasted macadamia nuts for pets. The toxic compound is unknown but the affect of macadamia nuts is to cause locomotory difficulties. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated. Dogs have been affected by eating as few as six macadamia kernels (nuts without the shell) while others had eaten approximately forty kernels. Some dogs had also been given macadamia butter. Luckily, the muscle weakness, while painful, seems to be of short duration and all dogs recovered from the toxicity. All dogs were taken to their veterinary surgeon. Pets owners should not assume that human food is always safe for pets. When it comes to chocolate, onions, garlic and macadamia nuts, such foods should be given in only small quantities, or not at all. Be sure that your pets cant get into your stash of chocolates, that food scraps are disposed of carefully to prevent onion and garlic toxicity and that your dog is prevented from picking up macadamia nuts if you have a tree in your garden.

Other potential dangers

– Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide poisoning)

– Potato peelings and green looking potatoes

– Rhubarb leaves

– Moldy/spoiled foods

– Alcohol

– Yeast dough

– Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)

– Hops (used in home brewing)

– Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)Broccoli (in large amounts)

– Raisins and grapes

 

     Dr Cam Day BVSc BSc MACVSc is a veterinary surgeon, an animal behavior consultant and media presenter. In 1995 he qualified as a Member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in the discipline of Animal Behavior and is one of only 15 veterinarians with this qualification in Australia. He works full time in animal behavior management in Queensland.

 

Dietary Supplements & Hygiene Products

NUVET SUPPLEMENT:

     Our dogs receive daily Vitamin C from when the mother is first breed, until the end of days. First, the weaning pup is given powdered Vitamin C (200Mg) on the semi-solid food, until it can swallow the pill form. Powdered Vitamin C supplement is available at ANY good Health Food Store. If it is unattainable, we suggest over-the-counter Vitamin C (Like found at Costco) 500mgs at early a.m. and 500mgs at sundown.NuVet Multi-vitamin Herbal Supplement

FEEDING:

     Feed 4 times a day (beginning with an 8 to 10 week old pup) Once the puppy is 4 to 5 months old (or all adult teeth are in) feed 3 times a day. Start with a cup to one full cup of dry kibble if he eats it all- feed more. If he leaves some, good. Feed 2 times a day from 6 months on. Your dog should not be considered fat. This can affect his health and his hip joints. You should see a waist line on a grown dog, and see the outline of his ribs. But you should never be able to count the ribs. (This applies to a grown dog only) Be sure to fatten your puppy while he is growing. He will use the food for growth.

    

     We personally, free feed our puppies and some of our adults dry kibble. This means the dry kibble is left out all day for them. They seem to eat only when they are hungry. No one seems to be overweight, or too thin. This method is entirely up to you. All dogs have different needs so the above feeding is only a guideline. Your pup is used to getting raw carrots, apples, squash, broccoli spears ground up and placed on top of the kibble lightly soaked with warm water every morning. This encourages them to eat their first meal. You may use a spoon or two of yogurt or cottage cheese, or egg, scrambled or raw once or twice a day. If you do not wish to add the water or the egg, all he really needs is the NuVet vitamin and a vitamin C in addition to the dry kibble

     We are feeding Life’s Abundance and add NuVet supplements for the first meal, I don’t recommend a crate training puppy to free feed. It makes it too hard to know when they need to eliminate. Remember, it takes 10 minutes to hour after a meal to eliminate. Life’s Abundance is recommended for the life of your dog it has a high protein content so as your puppy gets older you can feed your puppy the same food, but use more of it. It goes by the dogs weight, so be sure to look at the feeding instructions on the side of the bag. (the bacteria content is different and they will get very ill) I feed my dogs in crates here. It also eliminates fighting in multiple dog houses as well as food stealing. This way I can monitor who is eating what. (If you plan on feeding kibble in the crate, fine. I do not recommend feeding or giving water inside the crate)

Quick Tips:

If your puppy has diarrhea: use some chicken breast boiled up and broken into small pieces- on top of some white rice- 3 scoops of pumpkin (Libby’s, in the can) on top- for 3 days- if it persists past 4 days- call me.

For Yellow spots on the lawn- try some tomato sauce or paste. Scoop this on top of his food everyday as well. (A heaping spoonful) The acid in the tomatoes will neutralize the acid in the urine.

SNACKS:

     I don’t do too many snacks- but I recommend carrots, apples, squash, and homemade treats. As a fast food alternative, get some packaged or boxed biscuits or bones – at trader Joes- or look for Mrs. Hubbard’s or Life’s Abundance Snacks. Or you can bake your own with brown flour…I may have a recipe if you are interested See the butcher, and have him cut you up some bones with his ban saw. They can be placed in your freezer until your pup needs another. For obedience training, and sit, shake tricks, I use boneless and skinless chicken breast boiled and cut up into small pieces and placed in a zip lock bag in the fridge, as a training treat. Hot dogs, bacon and really yummy pup-perionis are all good too. Don’t give the puppy left over’s just yet. Make this transition very similar to what the puppy has had while living with us. When he is 4 months old, you can give him some left- over’s in his bowl after you are finished eating.

Settling-In:

     It will take your pup at least 7 days to settle in. During this time, spend as much time as possible carefully acclimating your pup to his new home and everything he will be exposed to there, such as other pets, vacuum cleaners, children, car rides, and neighbors. Your pup has had many experiences here, but it is necessary to keep exposing the pup to everything in his new world especially during these early months. Find places where he can visit such as friends and relatives, a pet store, a grooming shop, a dog training facility or parks where other people take their dogs after he has had his rabies shot. We do not recommend doing any traveling outside your backyard onto public grounds that is, until the dog is 4 months old and has fully had his shots and rabies shot has been administered. Then find pet friendly events, such as Animal Shelter fundraisers, or pet store promotions. Find a nursing home that welcomes visitors with pets. If it is an “only” pup, find friends with dogs that can be good and safe playmates. Continue exposing your new puppy to everything that will make up his world especially during the early weeks and always put the health of your pet first. Then continue right through his adult life. Use the Rocal spray on your shoe soles, and if necessary, spray the paws of your pet before re-entering your home.

    

     Always keep your pup safe from other animals that are not good with puppies, watch out for stairs, and never leave a young pup unsupervised with a child. If at any time your pup looks fearful, remove him from the situation and take him where he feels safe. Try again at another time when the pup has not been over stimulated or find a way to present the scary situation in a less frightening way. If the pup shows signs of fear, and makes an attempt to approach, reward him immediately. Never reward fearful behavior with words of encouragement, simply back the pup away or remove him until he feels safe enough to attempt an approach on his own.

EXERSICE:

      A pup’s bones are not fully hardened until the pup reaches 18 months old. It is very important to avoid repetitive activities such as long walks, and jumping until after that time. The very best exercise for a pup is free play with another dog on good footing. Never allow your pup to play roughly on a slippery surface. When you do not have access to another appropriate canine playmate, it is up to you to see that the pup receives appropriate exercise. Teaching the dog to retrieve a toy or ball is an excellent way for the pup to exercise. Start out slow with short distances and stop frequently to play hide and seek or practice tricks or obedience exercises. Use a long hall way and close off all the door so it is just the two of you. Roll the ball and encourage him to bring it back in exchange for a treat.

     A schedule is the best thing for a young pup. Make one up that works with yours and try to stick to it. Remember, no running or jogging hard with you on the street until at least 18 months of age. Slow walks, short and tiny walks are best at first. Remember the pup is still growing and too much is not good. Your pup could suffer lameness due to your ignorance. So, be extra careful as to how much you let him do. Ask your vet for more advice.

GROOMING:

     At least once a month, check the puppy’s nails and clip them, including the dew claws, if necessary. Clean out his ears with a cotton ball and gently brush the coat all over. I do puppies in my lap or standing nicely next to me. Brush teeth once a week, brush the coat once a say or once a week, and clean the ears once a week. Find a good groomer and take your pup in for a bath and nail clipping every month or so if you wish, just for the socialization and the nail clipping. Do not do any of this until your pup is over 4 months old and has received all of its vaccinations.

TRAINING:

     Find a good dog training center and sign up for basic obedience or puppy kindergarten. This is great practice for you in teaching your pup the basic obedience commands and is great socialization for the pup. Do not expect the pup to learn everything he needs to know by going to a few classes. The only way a pup will learn the obedience exercises are if you PRACTICE, PRACTICE, and PRACTICE. Many short sessions each day at home. Remember, your dog is always learning something, make it something positive!!

     Choose a POSITIVE reward class, with a very patient teacher, and don’t worry if your puppy seems hopeless. These are very sensitive and clever pups and they are learning much more than you think. A well trained puppy equals a well trained dog. Don’t let your pooch get away with anything now or you will be sorry later. Remember, there are no bad dogs. Just bad trainers/owners.

     We do offer help in the training area so give us a call if you get stuck and we can possibly take your pup in and get him started and trained or recommend someone reliable.

Already know how to train? Check Out this great website for some awesome training equipment for a great price!

www.fordogtrainers.com First-Class Quality Dog Training Stuff – Wide selection of leather agitation training muzzles, pulling nylon harnesses, walking in style spiked collars, tracking leashes, bite suits etc. for medium, large and giant dog breeds.

Labrador Potty Training Guide:

     So… you buy your new adorable puppy, bring it home, everyone in your house falls in love with the adorable puppy Until it uses your floor as a toilet!  After so many accidents, the puppy isn’t so adorable any more. Unfortunately a puppy is just like us when we are an infant. It is said that over 80% of dogs in shelters are euthanized because they aren’t potty trained. This is just sad!

     Here at SoCal Labradors, we have several different ways of potty training our puppies: Crate Potty Training, Potty training with Verbal commands, and Potty training with a 3×2 foot piece of fake grass and X-Pen.

Crate Potty Training:

     Puppies can comprehend the same way we can, but it does take a bit of time and patience. When you potty train your puppy with a crate, at first the puppy wont understand why it’s been put into the crate, the puppy might be scared, the puppy might not want to be inside the crate, and the puppy might have separation anxiety from being alone and bored. Do not force the puppy into the crate, you need to entice the puppy to go into the crate with treats or a tasty bone. The first few days of crate training is very rough because the puppy will bark a lot. The puppy will eventually get acclumated to the crate. You may expierence a few accidents inside the crate for the first four days. Try to remember to let the puppy out often to encourage the puppy to do its buisness outside. Either way, the puppy must stay inside the crate for at least one hour at a time, increasing the time by fifteen minuets, up to a half an hour, three hours max. (especially over night). It helps if you put your puppy on a schedule (potty time, play time, eat/drink time then back in the crate). When you let you puppy outside to go potty, go outside with the puppy and bring some treats with you, when you see the puppy go potty, give the puppy a treat when its done and say “good potty!” in a “Happy Tone” of voice, so the puppy knows it’s doing the right thing. This process is repeated, if the puppy is barking in the crate, that is a sign that the puppy needs to go potty. It is tempting to let the puppy out of the crate every time the it barks, but the puppy needs to know it has to be quiet inside the crate, so you dont want to let the puppy out every time it barks or the puppy will be training you! You can gauge this by keeping a journal, and keeping record of times to let puppy out. Never allow your new puppy to run around inside your house just after opening your crate door.  Carry or leash walk your puppy outside to go potty each time in the designated potty area or area in which you want him to eliminate. The puppy has to learn that the crate is its little home until its potty trained. The puppy must be fed in the crate and it must sleep in the crate until it is trained to not go potty inside the crate. This will come in time, there will be accidents along the way. The crate training process takes 2-3 weeks and it is extremely effective if the process is done correctly. But don’t forget that a puppy is just like an infant, there will be times where the puppy will be barking at four in the morning because it needs to go potty, letting it out right away is the best thing to do to ensure perfect crate training for your puppy.

Potty Training With a 3’x2′ piece of fake grass and an X-Pen:

     It might seem silly to train your puppy to go potty in a specific area, but it is possible. Picking up accidents all over your house in different areas is aggravating. Training the puppy to go potty in a specific area is so much easier to clean up.  This process needs someone to be with the puppy all day.To start with you need an X-pen that is adjustable to make it bigger or smaller. Then get a piece of fake grass, make sure it’s at least 3’x2′ feet, you can make your own platform so that the grass is elevated off the floor as well. To help soak up any liquids that sinks through the fake grass; fold up a towel and put it under the fake grass. To start the training off, find an area in your house to set up the X-Pen. (Pick an area with tile or hard wood floor, this makes it easy to clean up messes without staining your carpet.) Then start off the training by making the X-Pen really small; almost as if it was a crate. Leave enough room to have the fake grass, bowls for food and water, and a blanket for the puppy to sleep on. Just like crate training, the puppy will learn that the X-Pen is their dining room/bedroom with a bathroom. Over time the puppy will learn to only go potty on the fake grass, you also need to take the puppy outside on a leash frequently and wait for it to go potty outside, when the pup goes potty outside reward the puppy with a treat and have a “Happy Tone”. Once the puppy is trained to only go potty on the fake grass, you can slowly make the X-Pen bigger. Once you feel that your puppy is ready to advance to the next step, remove the X-Pen so that your puppy can run freely throughout the house. Keep the water/food bowls and blanket near the piece of fake grass. Now you watch the puppy and make sure it knows to only go potty on that piece of grass and nowhere else. The transition from going potty on the piece of fake grass to only going potty outside is really tough to teach most puppies. When your pup is fully potty trained to only go potty on the piece of fake grass without the X-Pen, that’s when you take the grass completely away and let the puppy outside with a leash frequently (every hour on the hour). If your puppy does make an accident, make sure you show the accident the puppy made and use your “Angry Tone” so the puppy realizes it did something wrong, say “No potty in the house!” Giving the puppy a little tap on the nose works along side with the “Angry Tone” but it’s optional.   Reward the puppy with a treat every time it goes potty outside. Essentially this process takes longer, and it’s harder to do depending on your puppy’s behavior, but the results of an accident are much easier to clean up!
Cleaning up is as easy as 1..2..3..
1. Pick up poop with a paper towel and dispose it. If there is pee, spray anti-bacterial cleanser on the accident and wipe up with a towel.
2. Remove folded towel under the fake grass if needed, and wash it. Clean the fake grass with a hose and anti-bacterial cleanser, and then hang it to dry off.
3. Once everything is cleaned and dried, reassemble all of it. Bam! That easy!

 

Verbal Potty Training:

     Verbal potty training is an alternative to crate potty training. It takes time, patience, commitment, and someone that can be with the puppy at all times. Since you are giving your puppy the privilege to run around the house freely, you should consider in blocking off important areas with baby gates. You must make sure the puppy is with you at all times! Do not forget to let the puppy out every hour on the hour! This process is so effective and it also teaches the puppy the tones of voice you use. There are 2 tones you use on a puppy: Your “Happy Tone” which is what tone you use when your puppy does something good (always reward with treats as well to emphasize the training). Your “Angry Tone” which is what tone you use when your puppy does something bad (example: goes potty in the house, destroys something of value, ect..) When your puppy makes an accident inside the house, you need to react right away by showing your puppy the accident. Use your “Angry Tone” so the puppy realizes it did something wrong, say “No potty in the house!” Giving the puppy a little tap on the nose works along side with the “Angry Tone” but it’s optional. Once you have showed the puppy what it did wrong, let the puppy outside right away so that you can watch the puppy go potty. Once it goes potty, show the puppy that going potty outside is a good thing by rewarding the pup with a treat and using your “Happy Tone”.  Eventually the puppy with catch on as it gets older. Remember that this process does take a lot longer than the Crate Potty Training, and it involves cleaning accidents in your house for the first week or so.

 

ENS:

      We found this process called ENS, which stimulates the puppies’ neurological system by applying mild stress to young pups in a very controlled and limited way. We have been using the Early Neurological Stimulation on our new born Labrador puppies once each day starting at only three days of age for about two weeks straight. ENS consists of five exercises; tactical stimulation, head held erect, head pointed down, supine position (laying on back), and thermal stimulation that should be done for 3-5 seconds each process. The tactical stimulation is done by holding the pup in one hand and with the other hand you gently tickle the pup in between the toes on any foot using a Q-tip. Using both hands, hold the pup straight up from the ground so the head is directly above its tail. Then, hold the pup where its head is reversed and is pointed downward towards the ground. Supine position is when you hold the pup resting in the palm of both hands with its nose facing the ceiling and it is okay if the pup has sleep struggle. Placing the pup on a damp towel with its feet down is the thermal stimulation. The puppy should not be afraid of falling during the exercises, so it should be safely and securely held. The benefits for ENS include: improved cardiovascular performance, stronger heart beats, stronger adrenal glands, more tolerance to stress and greater resistance to disease.

*Clinically proven for  improved cardiovascular performance, stronger heart beats, stronger adrenal glands, more tolerance to stress and greater resistance to disease.*

Rule of 7:

     Labrador puppies and all other puppies should go through the puppy socialization called the Rule of Seven.  By the time a puppy is seven weeks old it should have: been on seven different types of surfaces, played with seven different types of objects, been in seven different locations, met and played with seven new people, been exposed to seven challenges, eaten from seven different containers, and eaten in seven different location. The different surfaces could include carpet, grass, gravel, wood, concrete, dirt, and vinyl. Different objects could be from big to small balls, fuzzy toys, squeaky toys, metal items, and soft fabric toys. Front and back yard, basement, kitchen, car, bathroom, and garage are different locations. Children and older adults or someone in a wheelchair or walker are good examples of new people they should meet. Some challenges are: having to climb over obstacles, go up and down stairs, going through a tunnel, and playing hide and seek. The containers that they should eat from could be plastic, metal, cardboard, and paper. They could eat from inside a crate, living room, bathroom, kitchen, yard, and basement. Puppies should always exposed to a variety of people, places, sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and textures while they are still developing. A new stimulus should be introduced to the puppy about every four to seven days and the puppy could act differently to each one.

 

ENS:

We found this process called ENS, which stimulates the puppies’ neurological system by applying mild stress to young pups in a very controlled and limited way. We have been using the Early Neurological Stimulation on our new born Labrador puppies once each day starting at only three days of age for about two weeks straight. ENS consists of five exercises; tactical stimulation, head held erect, head pointed down, supine position (laying on back), and thermal stimulation that should be done for 3-5 seconds each process. The tactical stimulation is done by holding the pup in one hand and with the other hand you gently tickle the pup in between the toes on any foot using a Q-tip. Using both hands, hold the pup straight up from the ground so the head is directly above its tail. Then, hold the pup where its head is reversed and is pointed downward towards the ground. Supine position is when you hold the pup resting in the palm of both hands with its nose facing the ceiling and it is okay if the pup has sleep struggle. Placing the pup on a damp towel with its feet down is the thermal stimulation. The puppy should not be afraid of falling during the exercises, so it should be safely and securely held. The benefits for ENS include: improved cardiovascular performance, stronger heart beats, stronger adrenal glands, more tolerance to stress and greater resistance to disease.

*Clinically proven for  improved cardiovascular performance, stronger heart beats, stronger adrenal glands, more tolerance to stress and greater resistance to disease.* 

 

Rule of 7:

  Labrador puppies and all other puppies should go through the puppy socialization called the Rule of Seven.  By the time a puppy is seven weeks old it should have: been on seven different types of surfaces, played with seven different types of objects, been in seven different locations, met and played with seven new people, been exposed to seven challenges, eaten from seven different containers, and eaten in seven different location. The different surfaces could include carpet, grass, gravel, wood, concrete, dirt, and vinyl. Different objects could be from big to small balls, fuzzy toys, squeaky toys, metal items, and soft fabric toys. Front and back yard, basement, kitchen, car, bathroom, and garage are different locations. Children and older adults or someone in a wheelchair or walker are good examples of new people they should meet. Some challenges are: having to climb over obstacles, go up and down stairs, going through a tunnel, and playing hide and seek. The containers that they should eat from could be plastic, metal, cardboard, and paper. They could eat from inside a crate, living room, bathroom, kitchen, yard, and basement. Puppies should always exposed to a variety of people, places, sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and textures while they are still developing. A new stimulus should be introduced to the puppy about every four to seven days and the puppy could act differently to each one.

 We believe in creating better dogs, not just more of them. We stand behind our Labrador puppies and in doing so we have a great reputation, and want to keep it that way.  We guarantee our lab puppies for several years and educate you on how to train and care for them properly.  We offer house training, crate training, and basic obedience training on any of our Labrador puppies.  This is an extra service that we have found to be very popular especially with dual income families or family’s that want to bring in a well mannered junior dog, which won’t knock over the kids in excitement.  We believe that training is the key to owning a Labrador and it takes a lot of time and patience to train a dog on one’s own time.  Our consistent regiment is firm but loving with tactics that seem to prove that our Labrador puppies and young adults are fast learners. It is a real pleasure to buy a Labrador puppy already house broken and obedience trained because they have manners, come when they are called, and do a host of heartwarming tricks.  Our breeding Labrador retrievers are of champion lines, and most of our dogs all hold International titles.  We always say “Good labs aren’t cheap and cheap labs aren’t good.” One should know what they are getting into before they sign the dotted line. 

 We have shown many dogs throughout the years and we have also been involved in many AKC events. We’ve campaigned our dogs all over the United States with show handlers and have had a lot of fun in the International All Breed shows ourselves. We have titled 14 Labradors of our own in these shows, all of which make up our founding breeding stock. While we are no longer involved or active in showing, the puppy or dog you purchase has come out of one or more of our foundation dogs which holds a title in the ring. These stunning sons and daughters are here with us today and have taken over the breeding program that their show parents and grandparents were responsible for. Our Labrador retrievers are of quality, so they are not cheap, or inexpensive, but you will save hundreds and thousands of dollars in the long run by buying a quality dog from a reputable breeder with nicer blood lines. 

Environment:

Creating a Safe Home for Your Lab:
     Labs are curious. Both puppies and adult Labs like to “check things out.”In the yard, make sure that poisons and chemicals are out of reach and secured. The same applies for in the house: a common household cleaner or insecticide in the kitchen or bathroom cabinet can be harmful or life threatening to your lab. If your dog just ingested poison, bring him outside and administer 1 TSP (1/2 TSP for puppies) of salt on the back of his tongue, allow him to vomit, and call your Veterinarian.
Make sure your dog can’t escape your yard. Check all fences and gates. If you can find a way for him to go under or over, fix the problem! He doesn’t want to run away from you, but when you leave without him, he may want to go with you.
Is your pool or spa fenced? If not, Swimming Lesson #1 is: “How to get out.” Do not leave him in the yard alone until he gets out on his own, from every corner of the pool. Remember, a puppy can walk right through an Iron pool fence!

Lab Health Concerns:
     Surgery isn’t always the answer to the problem. Be careful of “knife-happy” Vets. Anytime a Veterinarian gives you some bad-news, double check his suggestions with your breeder. Additionally, this website has some great information regarding veterinarians, and diagnosing dysplasia and many other dog ailments.

Hip & Elbow Dysplasia:
     This is why we screen our dogs prior to breeding. Although, even if both of the breeding pair is clear, a dysplastic puppy could still be produced. Always remember, a dog with mild dysplasia can live a normal life, without any evidence of pain.

Dysplasia:

     Hip dysplastic problems are very costly and hard on any animal, and what’s worse is that they’re quite common especially in this breed.  We prevent this from the very beginning by using supplements in the food, and easy gentle play on our breeding Labrador adults to prevent such hip and joint ailments.  We do all the health checks necessary to prevent ailments on these wonderful innocent Labrador puppies by working hand in hand with a reputable Veterinarian. As mentioned before, we stand behind our dogs and puppies with generous guarantees just on the off chance something horrific were to happen. Most of our clients are coming back to us to get their second and third Labrador puppy as soon as they deem they can handle another addition to their family. We feel that buying a quality Labrador retriever from such nice lines should guarantee you of a better temperament; our labs are bred to meet the lab breed standards, so they will be easier to train, significantly calmer, and are beautiful to look at. We strive to give you a great experience and a DREAM Labrador Retriever puppy, or young adult.

VACCINATIONS/WORMING/MICROCHIPPING

     Your puppy has received its first puppy “2 way” puppy vaccination (canine distemper-Parvovirus vaccine) and was wormed several times, mainly once every other week until 7 and 8 weeks old. At 7 or 8 weeks old your puppy had his 5 way shot. (Parvovirus ,Canine Distemper, Parainfluenza & Adenovirus type 2) I recommend a “5” way puppy shot at 12 weeks, and then at 16 weeks. Then rabies shot at 16 weeks can also be had.

     It is important that your dog be protected against distemper and Parvo. I do not usually give any additional shots for any other diseases. Follow the recommendations of a trusted vet for vaccinations necessary for your area, such as for Lyme disease in areas with deer ticks. Too many shots are neither necessary nor good for the health of our pets.

We boost rabies shots every 3 years after the 1 year booster.

boost 5 way shots every 3 years as well- after the 1 year booster

WORMING:

     Your puppy was wormed previously (almost every other week) we have taken a stool sample to our vet to make sure your pup is free from worms. Take a fresh stool sample in to each vaccination appointment at 12 and 16 weeks and only give additional worm medication if necessary. Pups are extremely susceptible to worms and it isn’t a bad idea to have a stool sample checked monthly until they are about 6 months old especially if they are exposed to many other animals or places where other animals have been. Check with your vet for additional recommendations. (After the extensive worming we do here, I personally don’t worm my dogs unless I see them in their stool.)

Heartworm Medication:

      I do not use Heart medicine. I don’t believe my vet and I have seen a case of it in our area of Southern California in 20 years. Follow your vet’s recommendations for your area. But do not be roped into this as maintenance if you live in Southern California.

MICRO CHIPPING / TATTOOING:

     If your puppy is scheduled to be spayed or neutered, it is best to have the pup micro chipped at the same time. If your puppy is to remain intact, I recommend finding a microchip clinic put on by a local dog club which is much less expensive and does not require the pup to be sedated as most vet offices require. I have used both Home Again and Avid microchips.

     Tattooing is a less reliable way to permanently identify your pet. Tattoos on bellies can be hard to find under all that hair and tattooed ears can be removed.

Woolycoats

What the LRC says about a Labrador Coat:
     “
The coat is a distinctive feature of the Labrador Retriever. It should be short, straight and very dense, giving a fairly hard feeling to the hand. The Labrador should have a soft, weather-resistant undercoat that provides protection from water, cold and all types of ground cover. A slight wave down the back is permissible. Woolly coats, soft silky coats, and sparse slick coats are not typical of the breed, and should be severely penalized.

     A Woolly Coat only happens once or twice in about every 6 to 9 litters. In a litter of puppies only 1 or 2 pups in the litter will have a Woolly Coat, so although it’s not necessarily rare, you just don’t see it often in the Labrador breed. These are all AKC registered Puppies from AKC registered Sires and Dams, so the only real difference is their coat. The price is the still the same as other puppies. A woolly coated puppy in the litter appears to have a fluffier/thicker coat than its litter mates and tends to look like a fluffy cotton ball. As it grows up and out the fur is softer and it is as soft as a bed of feathers. At about 5 to 6 months old the woolly coat appears to look exactly like a light cream Golden Retriever. Many people have mistaken this woolly coated Labrador as being a Golden Retriever for this reason.  Bathing and grooming are done exactly the same as your standard flat coated Labrador retriever. The coat is silky, smooth, and tangle free which is unlike a Golden Retriever. Once all the adult hair comes in on these puppies’ coats the texture changes a bit. The guard hairs become a little less silky to the touch. There are no guaranties on the denseness of the adult fur, but we have seen more of a wiry feel on one of the ones with thicker coats that we have bred. Purposefully these dogs should not be placed in a reproduction breeding program, because they are only to be cherished as family pets. If we happen to be lucky enough to have a Woolly Coat Puppy in a litter you shouldn’t hesitate to take them home because just how rare it is to see a woolly coated Labrador!

Teresa: 1-805-444-8127 
socallabradors@gmail.com

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